Share

Invasive Species QuickSheets

QuickSheets are two-page documents developed with PA DCNR-State Parks to provide specific control recommendations for the most common invasive plant species in natural areas. The audience for these sheets is natural resource professionals, who would have access to the equipment and materials described.
PDF, 210.7 kB

Knotweed is a rhizomatous forb that grows in dense, towering, monocultures, particularly in riparian corridors. This sheet provides the management approach and prescriptions to control Japanese knotweed and its congeners giant knotweed (Fallopia sachalinense) and Bohemian knotweed (Fallopia x bohemica).

PDF, 209.2 kB

This sheet describes the management approach and prescriptions to manage common reed, more commonly known as phragmites. Phragmites is a tall (8+ feet), rhizomatous, cool-season grass that grows in monocultures in wetland areas. The species is native to the northern hemisphere, including North America. However, exotic genotypes native to Europe and Asia are highly invasive in the eastern and central U.S.

PDF, 215.1 kB

The term 'exotic shrub' covers dozens of invasive species, including such notables as multiflora rose, autumn olive, shrub honeysuckles, Japanese barberry, privets, and the buckthorns. This sheet describes a general management approach and specific prescriptions to control most any of these exotic species.

PDF, 209.8 KB

Stiltgrass is an annual, warm-season, shade tolerant grass native to East Asia that is highly problematic in forest and other natural settings. This sheet describes the management approach and prescriptions for control.

PDF, 209.7 kB

Tree-of-heaven, or ailanthus, is a highly invasive, suckering tree species native to east Asia. Ailanthus is fast-growing, and will grow in sidewalk cracks, sun-baked subsoil, as well as verdant sites. This sheet describes the management approach and prescriptions to keep this pest in check.

PDF, 214.5 kB

Purple loosestrife is an herbaceous perennial that chokes wetlands and shores. It has prominent lavender blooms, and was introduced as an ornamental as well as accidentally through ship's ballast. This sheet describes the management approach and prescriptions for control.

PDF, 209.2 kB

Mile-a-minute is a spiny, annual vine native to east Asia that can reach lengths of 20 feet. Since its introduction in York County in the late 30's, its spread covers North Carolina to Ohio to Massachusetts. This sheet details the management approach and prescriptions to control mile-a-minute.

PDF, 216.6 kB

There are a number of invasive biennial species, including garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), poison hemlock (Conium maculatum), and common teasel (Dipsacus fullonum). This sheet covers the management approach and prescriptions to control weedy biennials in natural area settings.

PDF, 208.6 kB

The label 'woody vines' covers a number of invasive species, including Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), kudzu (Pueraria montana), porcelainberry (Ampelopsis brevipedunculata), and Chinese wisteria (Wisteria sinensis). This advisory outlines the management approach and prescriptions to control any invasive woody vine.

Article Details

Title

Invasive Species QuickSheets

This publication is available in alternative media on request.