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October 8, 2015

The Horticulture Club will be hosting the 102nd Anniversary of the Horticulture Show at Snider Agricultural Arena on Homecoming weekend, Saturday October 10th and Sunday October 11th.

August 25, 2015

Penn State turfgrass grad overseeing fields at Little League World Series.

June 12, 2015

The new Plant Genetics and Biotechnology option is a combination of basic science and technology-based classes designed for students who are seeking careers in agricultural sciences, plant breeding, plant molecular genetics and plant biotechnology based industries.

October 31, 2014

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- Jonathan Gingrich originally came to Penn State to wrestle, but found another passion -- landscape contracting -- along the way.

For more than a century, the Horticulture Club in the College of Agricultural Sciences has put together this annual free show, which allows visitors the opportunity to explore various aspects of horticulture.
September 12, 2014

The "Seasons of Horticulture" will be the theme of the 101st annual Penn State Horticulture Show, Sept. 27-28.

Gettysburg, Pa., native Nancy Kammerer in a pit practicing soil judging for the international event. She plans to graduate at the conclusion of the spring 2015 semester and then work in the field of soil conservation.
September 9, 2014

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- The study of agricultural sciences can lead to incredible opportunities. Penn State student Nancy Kammerer discovered this firsthand during her recent trip to Jeju, South Korea, for the first International Soil Judging Contest.

As co-owner of T&A Farms, Alex Cante grows produce sold only in his hometown of Lancaster, Pa., at the company's own stands.
July 8, 2014

Farming seven acres of land and selling the vegetables at two roadside stands, three grocery stores and a large market may seem like a lot for a student to take on. For Penn State sophomore Alex Cantey, it's business as usual.

April 28, 2014

What does the hardness of the football field have to do with concussions? According to a recent post in USA Football's "From the Field" blog, field density plays a sizable factor in head injuries. In fact, Penn State's Center for Sports Surface Research reported that 10 percent of concussions come from how hard the ground -- or the artificial turf -- is on a football field. A properly maintained playing surface can help reduce head injury risk. Whether natural or synthetic turf, field management practices directly affect field hardness and, in turn, risk of head injury. As a result, monitoring field hardness is key. In fact, the NFL now requires field managers to measure surface hardness before every game.

February 20, 2014

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- Students majoring in Turfgrass Science in the College of Agricultural Sciences will receive first consideration for a new Trustee Scholarship established by a pair of Penn State alumni. With a gift of $50,000, William F. and Diane Randolph, of Powell, Ohio, created an endowment to fund the M. Forest Randolph and William F. Randolph Trustee Scholarship, which will be awarded to a student in the college with demonstrated financial need. The Trustee Matching Scholarship Program maximizes the impact of private giving while directing funds to students as quickly as possible, meeting the urgent need for scholarship support. For Trustee Scholarships created through the end of For the Future: The Campaign for Penn State Students on June 30, 2014, Penn State will provide an annual 10 percent match of the total pledge or gift.

Sean Fitzsimmons
January 7, 2014

Sean Fitzsimmons was one of the lucky 13 chosen from around the country to work as an intern at Ball Horticultural Co. in 2012. The fifth-year Penn State horticulture student was thrilled to land the position at the huge international corporation's North American plant in Chicago. "Ball is one of the biggest names in horticulture," the Frankfort, Ill., native said. "I couldn't pass up the opportunity to work with them." The main project Fitzsimmons worked on was comparing unreleased varieties of vegetables and flowers developed by Ball to those of existing and new varieties from the company's competitors.

October 8, 2013

The team working in Penn State's Root Lab, led by Jonathan Lynch, professor of plant nutrition, is studying what the rest of us don't see--the work going on underneath the ground that enables the growth of healthier crops. Jonathan Lynch is a professor of plant nutrition in the Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences. His research focuses on plant root architecture, and how the study of plant roots can increase crop yields and improve global food security. Lynch conducts research on five continents, where he uses computer simulations to study root characteristics.

April 30, 2013

Grow your future with a degree in Plant Sciences! The Plant Sciences major is a new baccalaureate degree program designed for students seeking careers in agronomic and horticultural crop production systems and enterprise management, agroecology, crop production and protection, applied plant physiology, plant science research, and plant biotechnology.

April 23, 2013

For those who did not grow up around farms, it is difficult to understand everything that must occur to sustain one. And most people don't get to see how the crops actually are grown and how much of them goes to waste every year. Garrett Morrison, a junior studying Horticulture, has seen these things and wants to take everything he has learned at Penn State back home to improve these conditions. "I saw firsthand the labor and hard work farmers put into their products," said Morrison, of Latrobe, Pa. "I also saw and was appalled by the vast waste involved in modern agricultural practices. "Through my experience at Penn State, I was able to connect with other students who shared some of my views and have been able to work with ag leaders seeking to reduce it."

April 23, 2013

Climbing trees isn't just for kids — just ask David Leinbach, a senior teaching assistant for a climbing class offered as part of Penn State's Arboriculture minor. Not Out on a Limb: Landscaping student just loves his field "There's nothing better than getting up and saying, 'I'm going to go climb trees for class.' And anybody can take it, that's the best part," he said. "You're probably up about 60 feet when we climb the tall trees. You walk out to the tip of the branch, hopping from limb to limb. It's a lot of fun." Two summers ago, Leinbach interned with Bartlett Tree Experts in Bala Cynwyd, Pa. He started out as a groundsman, dragging brush and pruning, but soon got more involved. "I got into climbing, using chainsaws and regular handsaws in the trees. I had a blast, and now I have my own climbing gear."

April 23, 2013

Grace Garbini helped plant more than 5,000 trees in the summer of 2012. As part of a Rutgers University research project on hazelnut breeding, she was tasked with transplanting and inoculating hazelnut saplings to test their resistance to fungal infections. Because hazelnut trees can be both productive and highly resistant to disease, they offer researchers an opportunity to identify DNA linked to disease-resistant traits. The goal of the research is to breed highly productive trees that are disease resistant. "Two of my Penn State professors had worked at Rutgers in the past," explained Garbini, a Horticulture major with minors in Biology, French and International Agriculture. "They contacted their associates and helped me find an internship in a field I was interested in."

March 27, 2013

Most of us remember learning about ROY G. BIV when we were kids — the acronym for the sequence of colors in a rainbow: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. But Devan Burns put her knowledge of the rainbow to use last summer. The fourth-year horticulture major (business/production option) at Penn State interned with the owner of the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia. The facility allows the public to experiment with the process of creating art. It provides a studio, equipment and expert technicians to help artists work with fabric and other types of innovative material and media. It also is recognized as a contemporary art museum.

Andrew Haverstick on the scenic Irish coast.
February 5, 2013

Twelve students in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences recently discovered some of Ireland's greatest natural treasures in a two-credit course that included a nine-day trip. The students were exposed to different cultural practices and technologies while increasing their awareness and respect for diverse cultures.

Malloy
January 16, 2013

Turns out, watching ants is actually pretty entertaining, according to Spencer Malloy. Good thing for him, because it was one of the most important parts of his job last summer. The Penn State senior with a double major in agroecology and philosophy recently completed an internship at the University Park campus investigating how the presence of nematode parasites can affect carpenter ants.

December 20, 2012

A plant may start to prime its defenses as soon as it gets a whiff of a male fly searching for a mate, according to Penn State entomologists. Once tall goldenrod plants smell a sex attractant emitted by true fruit fly males, they appear to prepare chemical defenses that make them less appealing to female flies that could damage the plants by depositing eggs on them, the researchers said.

December 6, 2012

Dr. Kim Steiner, a professor of Forest Biology at Penn State shares information on the H.O. Smith Botanic Gardens at Penn State University. Also, Andrew Gapinski the Arboretum at Penn State horticulturist takes Paul Epsom on a tour to show him the plants and trees in this amazing educational garden.