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April 1, 2019

W. LaMarr Kopp International Faculty Awards Selection Committee has selected Mark Guiltinan and Siela Maximova, as a team, for the 2019 award in recognition of their contributions to the advancement of the university’s international mission. The team will be honored at the University Faculty and Staff Awards ceremony on Tuesday, April 2nd at the Nittany Lion Inn Alumni Ballroom, beginning at noon. https://news.psu.edu/story/564797/2019/04/02/academics/guiltinan-maximova-receive-2019-kopp-international-achievement

March 27, 2019

March 26, 2019 UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- Mark Guiltinan, J. Franklin Styer Professor of Horticultural Botany in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, is the recipient of the 2018 Alex and Jessie C. Black Award for Excellence in Research.

March 21, 2019

With support from the U.S. Department of Agriculture - Foreign Agricultural Service, the Cacao and Chocolate Research Network (CCRN) at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) is pleased to announce the 2019-2020 Visiting Scientist Program. The program will support visiting scientists to work with Penn State faculty and international collaborators to advance research that is critical to the development of the fine flavor cacao/chocolate industry in Latin America and the Caribbean. These visiting scientists will spend six months at Penn State. Currently, the program is only accepting applications for economics research of the fine flavor cacao market. Exchanges will take place within the September 2019 to May 2020 timeframe, with exact dates to be determined jointly by the visiting scientist and his/her Penn State faculty mentor.

February 6, 2019

The Penn State Endowed program in the Molecular Biology of Cacao is pleased to announce the 2019 Summer Internship Program for minority undergraduate college students supported by the Plant Genome Program of the National Science Foundation. The internship period is 8 weeks (June 1 to July 30, 2019). The interns will participate in plant genetics, molecular biology, biotechnology or bioinformatics research on Theobroma cacao, the chocolate tree. During the first 2 weeks of the internship period at Penn State, University Park campus in Pennsylvania, the interns will be introduced to cacao resercah. In the laboratory, the interns will join research teams and will be mentored by a postdoctoral and/or a graduate student researcher. For the following 4-week period the interns will join members of the research team to travel to Costa Rica where they will participate in a 2-week summer session at Earth University focusing on sustainable development and 2-week training at the Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (CATIE) in Costa Rica. Prior to the trip all students will participate in an international agricultural development orientation workshop presented by International Agriculture and Development Graduate Programs (INTAD) graduate students at Penn State. Following the training in Costa Rica, the internship will conclude with 2 weeks back at Penn State, University Park campus. At the completion of the internship, each participant will be required to prepare a presentation and present at a project meeting involving all participants.

September 26, 2018

Mark Guiltinan, professor of plant molecular biology in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, recently was named the J. Franklin Styer Professor of Horticultural Botany.

September 13, 2018

Congratulations to all authors and contributors! Transcriptomic analyses of cacao cell suspensions in light and dark provide target genes for controlled flavonoid production Adriana M. Gallego, Luisa F. Rojas, Oriana Parra, Héctor A. Rodriguez, Juan C. Mazo Rivas, Aura Inés Urrea, Lucía Atehortúa, Andrew S. Fister, Mark J. Guiltinan, Siela N. Maximova & Natalia Pabón-Mora Scientific Reports Volume 8, Article number: 13575 (2018)

September 2, 2018

With support from the U.S. Department of Agriculture - Foreign Agricultural Service, the Cacao and Chocolate Research Network (CCRN) at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) is pleased to announce the 2019-2020 Visiting Scientist Program. The program will support five visiting scientists to work with Penn State faculty and international collaborators to advance research that is critical to the development of the fine flavor cacao/chocolate industry in Latin America and the Caribbean. These visiting scientists will spend six months at Penn State or at a partner institution working on one of the following topic areas: advanced sensory evaluation, the fine flavor cacao market, or issues related to cadmium accumulation in cacao. Exchanges will take place within the January 2019 to May 2020 timeframe, with exact dates to be determined jointly by the visiting scientist and his/her Penn State faculty mentor.

May 11, 2018

Use of the powerful gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 could help to breed cacao trees that exhibit desirable traits such as enhanced resistance to diseases, according to plant scientists. The cacao tree, which grows in tropical regions, produces the cocoa beans that are the raw material of chocolate. Reliable productivity from cacao plants is essential to the multibillion-dollar chocolate industry, the economies of producing countries and the livelihoods of millions of smallholder cacao farmers. But each year, several plant diseases severely limit global production, with 20-30 percent of cocoa pods destroyed preharvest. CRISPR stands for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats. It is a way to modify an organism's genome by precisely delivering a DNA-cutting enzyme, Cas9, to a targeted region of DNA. The resulting change can delete or replace specific DNA pieces, thereby promoting or disabling certain traits. Previous work in cacao identified a gene, known as TcNPR3, that suppresses the plant's disease response. The researchers hypothesized that using CRISPR-Cas9 to knock out this gene would result in enhanced disease resistance. The ultimate goals of the cacao research are to help raise the standard of living for smallholder growers and stabilize a threatened cocoa supply by developing plants that can withstand diseases, climate change and other challenges.

February 8, 2018

Increasingly, chocolate-makers turn to science Researchers are studying chocolate to boost its health benefits and produce more of this tasty treat

February 24, 2017

Imagine working with cocoa all day, but never knowing the taste of chocolate. Lecturer Kristy Leissle says that’s the case for many farmers in Ghana, the number two producer of cocoa in the world, where high temperatures stymie the market. A new discovery by biologist Mark Guiltinan and his lab could change things, though, making chocolate less fickle and bringing it to millions - or billions - more people.